Android Manifest file

Every Android application must have a manifest file called AndroidManifest.xml file that describes the application. A sample manifest <?xml version=“1.0” encoding=“utf-8”?> <manifest xmlns:android=“http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android” package=“com.example.firstapp” > <application android:allowBackup=“true” android:icon=”@drawable/ic_launcher” android:label=”@string/app_name” android:theme=”@style/AppTheme” > <activity android:name=“com.example.firstapp.MainActivity” android:label=”@string/app_name” > <intent-filter> <action android:name=“android.intent.action.MAIN” /> <category android:name=“android.intent.category.LAUNCHER” /> </intent-filter> </activity> </application> </manifest> A manifest file is an XML document with manifest as …

Providing Audio Playback for Auto in Android

Drivers want to access their music and other audio content on the road. Audio books, podcasts, sports commentary, and recorded talks can make a long trip educational, inspirational, and enjoyable. The Android framework allows you to extend your audio app so users can listen to their favorite tunes and audio content using a simple, yet …

Getting Started with Auto on Android

Android Auto extends the Android platform into the car. When users connect their handheld devices running Android 5.0 or higher to a compatible vehicle, the Auto user interface provides a car-optimized Android experience on the vehicle’s screen. Users interact with compatible apps and services through voice actions and the vehicle’s input controls (like a touchscreen …

Testing Apps for Auto in Android

Testing your Auto app ensures that users do not encounter unexpected results or have a poor experience when interacting with your apps. Android now provides Desktop Head Unit (DHU), a testing tool for Auto apps that lets you test pre-released versions of your Android Auto apps without having to work from your car. The Desktop …

Providing Descendant and Lateral Navigation in Android

One way of providing access to the full range of an application’s screens is to expose hierarchical navigation. In this lesson we discuss descendant navigation, allowing users to descend ‘down’ a screen hierarchy into a child screen, and lateral navigation, allowing users to access sibling screens. Figure 1. Descendant and lateral navigation. There are two …

Planning for Multiple Touchscreen Sizes in Android

The exhaustive screen map from the previous lesson isn’t tied to a particular device form factor, although it can generally look and work okay on a handset or similar-size device. But Android applications need to adapt to a number of different types of devices, from 3″ handsets to 10″ tablets to 42″ TVs. In this …

Providing Ancestral and Temporal Navigation in Android

Now that users can navigate deep into the application’s screen hierarchy, we need to provide a method for navigating up the hierarchy, to parent and ancestor screens. Additionally, we should ensure that temporal navigation via the Back button is respected to respect Android conventions. Back/Up Navigation Design For design guidelines, read Android Design’s Navigation pattern …

Android Widgets

1. Android Widgets 1.1. Overview about AppWidgets Widgets are little applications which can be placed on a widget host, typically the home screen or the lock screen of your Android device. A widget runs as part of the process of its host. This requires that the widget preserves the permissions of their application. Widget use …

Android with SQLite database

1. SQLite and Android 1.1. What is SQLite? SQLite is an Open Source database. SQLite supports standard relational database features like SQL syntax, transactions and prepared statements. The database requires limited memory at runtime (approx. 250 KByte) which makes it a good candidate from being embedded into other runtimes. SQLite supports the data types TEXT …