Monthly archives: November, 2016

Providing Descendant and Lateral Navigation in Android

One way of providing access to the full range of an application’s screens is to expose hierarchical navigation. In this lesson we discuss descendant navigation, allowing users to descend ‘down’ a screen hierarchy into a child screen, and lateral navigation, allowing users to access sibling screens. Figure 1. Descendant and lateral navigation. There are two …

Planning for Multiple Touchscreen Sizes in Android

The exhaustive screen map from the previous lesson isn’t tied to a particular device form factor, although it can generally look and work okay on a handset or similar-size device. But Android applications need to adapt to a number of different types of devices, from 3″ handsets to 10″ tablets to 42″ TVs. In this …

Providing Ancestral and Temporal Navigation in Android

Now that users can navigate deep into the application’s screen hierarchy, we need to provide a method for navigating up the hierarchy, to parent and ancestor screens. Additionally, we should ensure that temporal navigation via the Back button is respected to respect Android conventions. Back/Up Navigation Design For design guidelines, read Android Design’s Navigation pattern …

Android Widgets

1. Android Widgets 1.1. Overview about AppWidgets Widgets are little applications which can be placed on a widget host, typically the home screen or the lock screen of your Android device. A widget runs as part of the process of its host. This requires that the widget preserves the permissions of their application. Widget use …

Android with SQLite database

1. SQLite and Android 1.1. What is SQLite? SQLite is an Open Source database. SQLite supports standard relational database features like SQL syntax, transactions and prepared statements. The database requires limited memory at runtime (approx. 250 KByte) which makes it a good candidate from being embedded into other runtimes. SQLite supports the data types TEXT …

Creating a Navigation Drawer in Android

The navigation drawer is a panel that displays the app’s main navigation options on the left edge of the screen. It is hidden most of the time, but is revealed when the user swipes a finger from the left edge of the screen or, while at the top level of the app, the user touches …

Creating Swipe Views with Tabs in Android

Swipe views provide lateral navigation between sibling screens such as tabs with a horizontal finger gesture (a pattern sometimes known as horizontal paging). This lesson teaches you how to create a tab layout with swipe views for switching between tabs, or how to show a title strip instead of tabs. Swipe View Design Before implementing …

Providing Proper Back Navigation in Android

Back navigation is how users move backward through the history of screens they previously visited. All Android devices provide a Back button for this type of navigation, soyour app should not add a Back button to the UI. In almost all situations, the system maintains a back stack of activities while the user navigates your …

Providing Up Navigation in Android

All screens in your app that are not the main entrance to your app (the “home” screen) should offer the user a way to navigate to the logical parent screen in the app’s hierarchy by pressing the Up button in the action bar. This lesson shows you how to properly implement this behavior. Up Navigation …